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PILGRIMS AND PURITANS:
BIOS OF OUR EARLY ANCESTORS
TO AMERICA
PAGE 5


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PILGRIM AND PURITAN GRANDFATHERS
IN OUR FAMILY TREE:
BIOS

 
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17) ANTOINE GEVAUDEN

b: 1670 "of" HENRICO CO., VA (8GGF)

(thank you Cousin Carolyn Miller for the following data)
17a) Descendants of Antoine Gevaudan Generation
No. 1 1. ANTOINE1 GEVAUDAN was born 1665 in Pro
Provence, France, and died 1726 in Henrico County,
VA. His wife's name is unknown.  They mar Abt. 1701.
She was born Abt. 1680, and died Bef. February 03, 1726/27.
17b) Notes for ANTOINE GEVAUDAN: The Gevaudan
family came from the Gevaudan County towns of
Mende France, and across the mountains into Dauphine.
There is also a forest called Le Gevaudan Forest.
Anthony (Antoine) native of Normandy, France came to
America September 20, 1700, patented lands in
Albemarle County, Virginia 1711. Anthony married
in America but his wife's name is not known. Antoine
came to early Virginia with other Huguenots and
settled in Manakintowne. In 1818, Thomas, a great-
grandson of Antoine, came with his wife Leah
 (Hendrick) Jividen and family to the Mason County,
VA (WV) area. Thomas died the first year and by 1823
his family was living on Parchment Creek in
present Jackson County. The surname is spelled
Jividen in West Virginia and Gividen or Gevedon
in Kentucky. Carl and Frances Jividen of Londonderry,
OH did much of the research on the early Gevaudan,
 Gividen, Gevedon, Jividen families. Joseph Gividen of
Fresno, California in 1979 published a book on the
 Gividen line of the family. In 1981 Cameron Allen
of East Orange, New Jersey wrote "Antoine
Gevaudan of Manakin Town and His Immediate
Descendants" published in Genealogies of Virginia
Families from The Virginia Magazine of History and
Biography Volume III. "Antoine Gevaudan was among
 the French Protestant refugees landing at the James
River Colony of Virginia on September 20, 1700, in
the ship "Ye Peter and Anthony" galley of London,
Daniel Perreau, commander. The name was
(as transcribed) Anthony Giovdan, presumably, a single man,
as listed on the ship list. He, like many other Frenchmen
who settled at Manakintowne, Virginia, had fled France
to avoid persecution by the Roman Catholic Church.
Having fled to England, they helped William of Orange
overthrow King James II. For their help, they had been
given free passage to the New World and 10,000 acres
of new land had been surveyed for them. On March 23, 1715,
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Anthony Gevodan was granted 128 acres in King William
 Parish thus acquiring his share of the lands
distributed to the French refugees. The patent of the
same date to John Lavillian was bounded by the
land of "Anthony Gevodan" while a patent of the same
date to Abraham Salle' was bounded by the land of
 "Anthony Geavodan". On March 4, 1725, Anthony
Jevodan patented 200 acres on Jones Creek, bounding
the land of Mathew Oge (Agee). On August 25, 1718,
Antoine Givaudan was among those newly elected to the
 vestry of King William Parish. His presence at vestry
 meetings is regularly noted thereafter, as Givaudan,
Givaudant, Givaudant, and Givodan. On April 26, 1723,
"By a plurality of votes the Sieur Antoine Givodan and
Jean Chastain were elected church wardens of the parish
of King William. The Sieur Givodan took the oath of
church warden." At the end of their standard year as
church wardens, Gevaudan and Chastain were replaced
April 7, 1724, by "the Sieur Pierre Dutoy and the Sieur
Pierre David, Senior." On May 14, 1726, "Jean
Chastain and Anthonine Givodan rendered account of
their administration for the year 1723
in the presence of the church wardens and vestrymen."
This is the last reference to Gevaudan as alive. The King
William Parish tithable lists from 1710 through 1725
contain the name of Anthoine Givandan, Giauandant,
Givaudan or Givodan. Occasional lists include
extraneous adults residing with him: in 1715,
 John Robisson, in 1724, Jean Bernard. The
 "Liste Generalle de Tous les Francois Protestants
Refugies Establys dans la Paroisse du Roy Guillaume"
 of about 1714 contains Anthoine Giraudan as head
of a household, with a wife, one son and one daughter.
He drops from the tiltable lists in the year 1726.
In consequence, it would seem that his death may
be placed sometime between his church warden's
accounting of May 14, 1726 and the date of the
drawing up of the tithable list for 1726. Source
 "Antoine Gevaudan of Manakin Town and His
Immediate Descendants" by Cameron Allen.
Manakintowne, VA is located 20 to 30 miles from
 the present city of Richmond.
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I want to share with
you something that was written in "Documents,
Chiefly Unpublished, relating to Huguenot
Emigration to Virginia and to the Settlement at
Manakin-Town. "Edited and compiled for the
Virginia Historical Society by R. A. Brock, 1973.
Hon. L.C. Draper, LL.D., Madison, Wisconsin
furnished the following.. Even though this is not
about our Antoine Gevaudan, it gives you an idea
of France in that time period and why our
ancestors fled France. This is about a man that
 came over with Antoine Gevaudan on the ship
Ye Peter and Anthony. The escape of Anthony
Trabue and of the settlement at Manakintowne,
prepared by his grandson, Daniel Trabue, son of
John James and Olymphia Dupuy Trabue was
 published in the "Richmond Standard", May
10-17, 1879. "My grandfather, Anthony Trabue,
 fled from France in the year of our Lord, 1687, at the
time of a bloody persecution against the dissenters by the
Roman Catholics. The law against the dissenters was very
 rigid at that time. Whoever was known to be one, or even
suspected, if he would not swear to visit the priest, his life
 and estate were forfeited, and he was put to the most
shameful and cruel torture and death. And worse than all,
they would not let any move from the kingdom. Guards
 and troops were stationed all over the kingdom to stop
and catch any that might run away. At every place where
 they would expect those persons might pass, there
were guards fixed and companies of inquisitors,
and patrols going on every road, and every other
 place, hunting for those heretics, as they called them;
and where there was one who made his escape, perhaps
 there were hundreds put to the most shameful torture
and death. When the decree was first passed,
a number of the people thought it would not be put
 in execution so very hastily; but the priest, friars and
 inquisitors were very intent for their estates, and they
rushed quick. I understand that my grandfather,
Anthony Trabue, had an estate, but concluded he
 would leave it if he could possibly make his escape.
He was a very young man, and he and another young
 man took a cart and loaded it with wine, and went on
to sell it to the farthermost guard; and when night came
 they left their horses and cart, and made their escape
 to an English ship, which took them on board, and they
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went over to England, leaving their estates, native
 country, relations, and everything they had."
Our cousin Denny Lee explans his theory as to
why some people think the Gevaudans come from a
Scandinavian County.  " The French Huguenots got pushed
out of France, then into Protestant, Germany, then into
Switzerland, then up to Norway and from there onto England,
 then eventually the New World. I think some who heard about
this may not of heard the full story of their travels. The Huguenots
stayed in each of those countries for a significant time before
moving on to the next country. Somewhere along the
VERBAL line people forgot to tell about the countries
previous to Norway. This would explain why some people think
we came from Norway.
 See also:  In River Time; The Way of the James, by Ann
Matthews Woodlief (Chapel Hill: Algonquin Books, 1985),
pp. 82-84. Major sources of information: Richard P.
Maury's "The Huguenots in Virginia" and "The French
Huguenot Frontier Settlement of Manakin Town,"
James L. Bugg, Jr. in The Virginia Magazine of History
and Biography, V. 61, Oct. 1953, 359-94.
More recently published is The Diligence and the
Disappearance of Manakintowne's Huguenots by
Allison Wehr Elterich (Spartenburg, SC: Reprint
Company, 1999). "In 1700 the frontier was still just
upstream a ways, in the more hostile world of granite,
islands, and rapids above the tidewater.
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In July a ship
 [the Mary Ann] sailed into Hampton filled with 207 Huguenots,
exiled for years from their cozy, prosperous villages in France,
who hoped to build a French Protestant town in the Norfolk area.
They were welcomed by Governor Nicholson with disturbing
 news; their destination had been changed and they were to
go up the James. William Byrd I, inheritor of land in the Falls
 area and influential in the colony, had had the last word on their
 fate. They were to settle in the wilderness above the Fall Line,
securing that land for the white man. The omens were all
foreboding at Jamestown where the prospective settlers had
to transfer to smaller boats that could negotiate the curls.
The town had recently burned for the third time and so had
been abandoned as a capital. Sickness was still prevalent,
and many of the French proved as vulnerable as the earlier
settlers. As they learned more details about the requirements
of survival on the frontier, especially without a navigable
waterway, they became even more apprehensive, for their
skills were those of business, not farming. Not surprisingly,
many chose to desert here. Only 120 trusted themselves
 to the small boats and the currents of the James. Almost
immediately a boat that was filled with goods sank, claimed by
 the rough waters. This last leg of the voyage, overcast by dread
 and illness, must have been the worst. They passed the site of
 an earlier settlement called World's End, made the left turn into
 the Fall zone, and landed at the tiny trading outpost of rude
 houses around Shockoe Creek. Loading what was left of their
 supplies onto borrowed wagons, they trudged through the
 thick forests, following a faint path more than twenty miles
 into land long ago cleared by the Monacan Indians on the
 south bank of the river. Their ears still rang with the rushing
 of water over granite that would block their boats from the
 outside world of commerce. But the key to their survival lay
 in the unusually fertile floodplain of that same river.
It was a desperate fall and winter as the ill-prepared settlers
 used up their meager supplies, especially when another
group of more than a hundred Huguenots arrived in October
expecting to find a thriving town. [Three other ships arrived
 on the James and the Rappahannock Rivers: the Peter and
Anthony, the Nassau, and one whose name is not known.
All told, 500 prospective settlers boarded, but far fewer
settled at Manakin Town.] ]Friction developed between the l
eaders, meaning that the new group had to hack out a
settlement several miles downstream. Soon, though,
Byrd and Governor Nicholson proved their support by
soliciting charitable donations throughout the colony. The
ensuing generosity proved justified, for within a year the
French had learned to be adept farmers, growing fruit
and fat cattle on their bottom land, and establishing trade,
not warfare, with neighboring Indians. Although plans had
been drawn for a French-style village around a central
square, with outlying farmland along the river, these
never proved practical. The fertility of the piedmont
floodplain encouraged the Huguenots, like the Monacans
before them, to live more separately than they had intended,
becoming a segmented agrarian society which
stretched back from five miles of river bank. In time,
 they too lost their cohesive identity by
intermarrying and moving to other rivers." Children of
ANTOINE GEVAUDAN and MRS GEVAUDAN are:
 2. i. THOMAS2 GEVAUDAN, b. 1702, Henrico, Co., VA;
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d. Bef. July 23, 1731, Goochland, VA. 3. ii. ELIZABETH
GEVAUDAN, b. 1705, King William Parish, VA;
d. July 27, 1739. Generation No. 2 2. THOMAS2
GEVAUDAN (ANTOINE1) was born 1702 in Henrico,
Co., VA, and died Bef. July 23, 1731 in Goochland, VA.
He married JUDITH MARTIN 1728 in King William
Parish, daughter of JOHN MARTIN and MARGARET
LECAZE. She was born 1710 in Manakintowne, Henrico,
VA, and died January 27, 1786. Notes for THOMAS
GEVAUDAN: Thomas Gevaudan died at some time
between 19 Sept 1730 (at which time he took the oath
 of vestryman) and the composition of the 1731 tithable
 list. On this list his widow "Judith Giudon" was noted.
Thomas, who inherited 200 acre tract of land (located on
south side of James River on Jones Creek bounded
as by patent to Thomas March 24, 1725) from his father,
sold this land for 5 shillings to William and Elizabeth
Sallee on February 3, 1727. More About THOMAS
GEVAUDAN: Source: Turff & Twigg p 149 Notes for
JUDITH MARTIN: Judith is recorded by Turff & Twigg
page 149 as owning a slave child William. Judith and Rene
and her son John Gevaudan removed to Albemarle County
ca 1744 from their home on the north side of Jones' Creek
 where they had been living on land Rene had inherited
from his father. They lived in part of Albemarle Co that is
 now Buckingham Co and probably on land that had been
patented by Rene's brother, Peter Chastain Jr. in 1740.
Register Containing the Baptisms made in the Church
of the French Refugees at Manakintown in Virginia, in the
Parish of King William. In the Year of our Lord, 1721,
the 25th March. -- Done by James Soblet, Clerk. 25th October,
1731, was born to Judith Girodan a black named
Guillieaume. Child of THOMAS GEVAUDAN and
JUDITH MARTIN is: 4. i. JEAN/JOHN3 GEVAUDAN,
 b. March 01, 1729/30, King William Parish Goochland Co,
VA; d. Abt. 1780. 3. ELIZABETH2 GEVAUDAN
(ANTOINE1) was born 1705 in King William Parish,
VA, and died July 27, 1739. She married
GUILLAUME (WILLIAM) SALLE 1727 in Manakintown,
VA, son of ABRAHAM SALLE and OLIVE PERRAULT.
He was born 1705, and died February 15, 1789. Notes for
GUILLAUME (WILLIAM) SALLE: William Salle' was
willed a "plantation", a little mulatto boy and twenty pounds
sterling, or five thousand weight of tobacco (see the Will of
Abraham Salle'). After the birth of Oliver in 1749, he moved
 west to what later became Buckingham County (the courthouse
burned in 1869). We do have tax and tithable lists as records.
On January 12, 1747, William patented 1200 acres on both
sides of Joshua Creek, a branch of the Slate River, at that
 time, in Albemarle County. Three years later he sold practically
all of his and his 2nd wife, Magdalen's holdings in King William
Parish. At one time he seems to have owned 2050 acres, but by
1782 he had reduced his holdings to 700 acres. William was
about 83 years old when he died. Magdalen seems to have died
after 1800 (she may be on the tax list of Lincoln County,
Kentucky ?). William Salle' of the Parish of St. Anns, in the
county of Albemarle, in a whole series of deeds in May 1750,
virtually stripped himself of realty in King William Parish
 (Cumberland County). In 1771, he advertised for sale,
two tracts of land "on the branches of Slate River in the
 County of Buckingham", containing 950 acres and 400 acres
 "with all necessary houses for cropping and is convenient to
 Church, Mill and Courthouse". (Virginia Gazette) William was
 taxed in 1782 on 700 acres in Buckingham.
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He was taxed one
 person in Buckingham annually through 1789, then the tax
lists of 1790 records tax imposed on "Wm. Sallie Est." Magdelaine
 is listed through the year 1800, and still carried on the realty lists
 in 1803. The following are land entries found in Jillson's "Old
 Kentucky Deeds and Entries" 1782, 1783, 1785 - Abraham Sally
, 4 deeds, amounted to 1,600 acres. The location was at the
 Watercourse of the Kentucky River, Howards upper Creek, none
 & Grey's Run. (page 143) 1780 - John Sally, 400 acres, Knob
 Lick Branch George Sally, 400 acres, Willson's Creek
 Phillip Sally, 400 acres, Willson's Creek William Sally, 400
 acres, Knob Lick Creek Guillaume Salle' was born in 1705 in
 Manakintowne, Virginia. LDS Ancestral File 416F gives
 birth in 1720. He died on February 15 1789. The Douglas
Register lists the births of his children. He was married to
Marie Magdelaine Chastain in 1740 Elizabeth Givaudan
 - Married: about 1727- Virginia, Spouse: William (Guillaume)
 Sallee More About GUILLAUME (WILLIAM) SALLE:
Misc: donated supplies for Rev War effort Children of
ELIZABETH GEVAUDAN and GUILLAUME SALLE
are: i. ELIZABETH3 SALLE, b. July 04, 1728,
Manakintowne, VA; d. Abt. 1729, Manakintowne, VA.
More About ELIZABETH SALLE: Source: Huguenot
Emigration to Virginia page 81 ii. ELIZABETH SALLE,
 b. February 21, 1728/29, Manakintown, VA. iii.
GUILLIAUME WILLIAM SALLE, JR, b.
 April 17, 1732; d. 1732. More About GUILLIAUME
WILLIAM SALLE, JR: Source: Huguenot
Emigration to Virginia page 87 5. iv. WILLIAM
(GUILLAUME) SALLE, b. May 08, 1734, King
Edward Parish, VA; d. Bet. 1816 - 1820, Washington
County, KY. v. ISAAC SALLE, b. July 27, 1739,
Manakintowne, VA; d. 1739, Manakintowne, VA.
Generation No. 3 4. JEAN/JOHN3 GEVAUDAN
(THOMAS2, ANTOINE1) was born March 01,
 1729/30 in King William Parish Goochland Co, VA,
 and died Abt. 1780. He married MAGDALENE
 CHASTAIN 1755, daughter of PIERRE CHASTAIN
 and MILDRED ARCHER. She was born 1733. Notes
 for JEAN/JOHN GEVAUDAN: Jean (John) lived all his
adult life in Buckingham Co. Records from this county are
very limited since the Court House burned in 1869 and
 destroyed all records. Jean may have had daughters
 but there are no records to indicate who they were or
 whom they married. Turff & Twigg page 84 John, son of
Thomas Gevaudan, was called John Jeffdon in his
Grandfather Martin's will. John Gevaudan was reared in
the home of his stepfather Rene Chastain, son of Peter
 Chastain Sr. who died in 1728. Rene and Judith Chastain
 and her son John Gevaudan removed to Albermarle
 County about 1744 from their home on the north side
of Jones' Creek. Shortly after attaining his majority, he
 and his stepfather Chastain in effect "swapped" several
negroes between themselves. On October 3, 1751,
 "John Givodan" sold to Rane Chastain for 150
 one parcel of negroes, one woman named Bate,
 another named Mary & one boy named Jack
& one girl Base." John Gevodan signed by mark.
The same date "Rane Chastain sold to John Givodan
 for 160 one parcel of Negroes, a man Will, Woman Luce,
and three children Ginne and Nane and Olimp". "Bate"
was presumably the "Betti" his father had owned in 1730.
 Will may have been the black "Guillieaume"
baptized in 1731. One month later, on November
 12, 1751, "William Cannon, carpenter, sold John
 Givodan for 75 four hundred acres on the north
branch of Willisses Creek in Albermarle County."
source "Antoine Gevaudan of Manakin Town and His
 Immediate Descendants" by Cameron Allen 1981
By the birth of Jean's first child in 1756, Manakintowne
was virtually deserted.
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The records of King
 William Parish end in 1750. There may have been other
 children, especially daughters. James Monroe Gevedon,
November 26, 1953, wrote the following: John Givadon
 was raised by stepfather Rane Chastain and was known
 by the name John Gividon Chastain but at his maturity
he and his mother sold his inherited land
by deed made in 1750 and he signed as John Gividen.
About this time John married Magdalin Chastain, his
 stepsister. They had a large family but I have no record of
 but one Joseph who grew up to be a large strong man and
 a Baptist preacher." In an email from Gerre Buland,
Genealogist for the Pierre Chastain Family Association
dated 10/07/1999. Dear Carolyn, I checked both the
 PCFA database & Cameron Allen's articles on the Chastain
 family in Manakintown, Virginia. We do not show that Rene
 Chastain (2) had any other wife than Judith (Martin) Gevedon.
I have heard this rumor before but found no evidence of
 any other marriage. The only children we have documentation
 for are: Isaac, Peter, Marianne, Rene, Jr. & Judith. Gerre
Since Rene was never married more than once, Jean/John
could not have a stepsister. ======= Register Containing
 the Baptisms made in the Church of the French Refugees
 at Mannikintown in Virginia, in the Parish of King William.
 In the Year of our Lord, 1721, the 25th March. -- Done by
James Soblet, Clerk. The 1st March, 1729, was born Jean
Gierodan, son of Thommas Girodan and of Judith, his wife;
 was baptized the 12th of April following by Mr. Massom;
 had for godfather, Guillaume Salle and Jaque Martain;
 for godmother, Md. Martain. The parties have declared
 that he was born the day and year above. Jean Chastain,
 Clerk More About JEAN/JOHN GEVAUDAN:
 Christening: April 12, 1730, Goochland, VA Source:
 Huguenot Emigration to Virginia page 84 Notes for
 MAGDALENE CHASTAIN: I have no proof that this
Magdalene Chastain is the wife of Jean Gevaudan.
However, after comparing information with several people
and checking things as carefully as possible, it seems that this
 Magdalene makes more sense than Jean's stepsister being
his wife. There is no information that Rene was married
 before Judith Martin, therefore, there is no stepsister. CJM
10/07/1999 In an email from Shirley Chasteen, 10/12/1999.
"In the book Pierre Chastain and his Descendants, Vol 1
first five generations is this listing. Magdalene Chastain
 married to Jean Gevaudan/John Gevedon listed as known or
speculated children of Pierre Chastain, Jr. and his wife, Mildred
"Middy" Archer. page 17." Children of JEAN/JOHN
GEVAUDAN and MAGDALENE CHASTAIN are: i. ELIZABETH
 ANN4 GIVODAN, b. Abt. 1750, VA; d. January 30, 1823, Shelby
Co., KY; m. JOSEPH FOREE, 1774, Buckingham Co., VA; b. May
 31, 1744, King William Parish, Goochland Co., VA; d. 1835, Shelby
 Co., KY.  ELIZABETH ANN GIVODAN: Burial: Old Shelbyville
 Cemetery by Presby. Church Source:
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Julia Mortenson and the
Foree Family Bible lists the children of Joseph and Ann
stating her given name as Elizabeth. Notes for
JOSEPH FOREE: The Trimble Co. Heritage book of
1989 contains several pages of information about the
 Foree family including this very touching letter from Joseph
 to his sister Keziah in NY. Joseph Foree is writing to his
 sister, Keziah Foree Wyckoff, who lived in New York State.
 She was captured by Indians at Martin's Station in 1780 and
 taken to Detroit then on to Quebec where she met and married
 Mr. Wyckoff. Can you imagine?????? Shelby County, Ky.
 June 24,1826 Dearly beloved Sister, I am in possession
 of your address written December 15,1825, which only came
 to hand the 20th of the present month, and it affords me no
small degree of pleasure to receive it, and learn that you are
 yet spared upon the land of the living. Though there is pain,
 mingled with joy when I learn of your losses in the way of
 family, yet I know it is what we should all expect, and I hope
 you will exercise that cool philosophy which we are all
commanded to do. He or she who hath, can only lose,
and death we know is the final end to all who live on this earth,
and your loss may have been their gain. I have not heard
 one word from you for years, and when I look at your address
and discover that you have intentions of visiting your old
brother, it makes my heart leap with joy in anticipation of it.
 How happy it would make me feel if we should live to realize
 the meeting moment. If your family conditions would admit of it,
 I should like for you to stay some considerable time, or to make
 your home with me for life. I now stand alone as it was the will
 of Almighty God to take your sister** from me the 30th of
J. 1823. My children are as yet all living, save my son
Joseph, who departed this life in 1815. My daughter,
Nancy, lives in the state of Tennessee, 300 miles
 distant from me. Rebecca, my youngest daughter,
 save Virginia, lives in Christian County, Kentucky,
230 miles from me. The balance of my children are
 all in 15 miles of me and are well, with their families
as far as I know. My youngest son, Jefferson, is yet
single and lives with me. This will start for you while
I am in health and thanks be to God, in my proper
 mind, which I pray Almighty to continue with me whilst
 I remain on earth, and matter and life connected. I hope
 you will be sure to make your intended visit to Kentucky.
 Our brothers, so far as I know, are yet all living. Brother
 Peter has lost his wife, though he lives himself upon the
 farm where you last saw him. Silas lives near Peter and
Jesse is where he lived when you were in Kentucky.
 Brother John is yet in Georgia, and Frank in Tennessee.
Our sister, Mary, is not very far distant from Natchez. You
 will now be so good as to present my love to each of your
 children as an uncle to them, and accept for
yourself the undivided love of your old brother. Praying
 that we may meet again upon the shores of time. But if it
 should be the will of God to order differently that we may
 be of the goodly number who will hear our Father say,
"Come, enter in, thou good and faithful servant", and
enjoy the Crown that fadeth not, laid up for thee from
 before the foundations of the Earth. O may it be so with
all of ours when we may see and know all of ours. When
there will be no further parting. May this be our happy
lot is my chief concern. Remember each of my children,
as they wish, to yourself and family. From your old brother
an affectionate farewell, Joseph Foree ("To his well
 beloved sister, Keziah, being four score and four years old
 on the 22nd of June, 1826." This letter was written to
 Keziah Foree Wyckoff and a copy sent to the Kentucky
Historical Society.
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This is also certified.) Rebecca, married
Richard P. Dawson, moved to Christian Co., later Trigg Co.
 (Note: This Joseph Foree was brother of Jesse Foree who is
 buried in Trimble County. Silas and Peter were in Henry
 County at this time.) ** : the "sister" referred to here is
 Ann Gividen Foree. I have seen "sister-in-law", as we
now call it, referred to as "sister" in other old documents.
 Also note it took 6 months for the letter to get from
New York to KY. I guess they were lucky it got there at
all! Julia Mortenson** More About JOSEPH FOREE:
Military service: Revolutionary War Soldier, having
 fought at Guilford Courthouse Source: The Douglas
Register ii. JOHN GIVIDEN II, b. 1756, Alebemarle
County, VA; d. April 17, 1835, Henry County, Kentucky;
 m. MARY MIMMS, January 31, 1785, Alebemarle
 County, VA; b. June 18, 1766, Goochland, VA; d. 1848,
 Henry County, Kentucky. Notes for JOHN GIVIDEN II:
John Givodan and Mary Mims moved to Henry
Co.,Kentucky in 1826. Most all the descendants of
John and Mary Mimms Givodan spell the name Gividen.
 As a young man John served five tours of three month's
duration each as drafted militiaman from Buckingham County.

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